Difference between revisions of "First language acquisition"

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'''First language acquisition''' (FLA) refers to the emergence of [[language]] in infants, within the field of [[linguistics]] known as ''[[language acquisition]]'', which covers the development of language in [[learning|learners]] of all ages. FLA is an academic subject studied by [[theoretical linguistics|theoretical]] [[linguist]]s, but also involves others fields such as [[psychology]]. As linguists often argue that the process of FLA is similar to [[second language acquisition]], these disciplines can overlap considerably.
'''First language acquisition''' (FLA) refers to the emergence of [[language (general)|language]] in [[infancy|infants]], within the field of [[linguistics]] known as ''[[language acquisition]]''. This covers the development of language in [[learning|learners]] of all ages. FLA is an academic subject studied by [[theoretical linguistics|theoretical linguists]], but also involves others fields such as [[psychology]]. As linguists often argue that the process of FLA is similar to [[second language acquisition]], these disciplines can overlap considerably.


Although all [[child]]ren raised in a normal environment ''acquire'' a particular language or languages - i.e. come to understand and produce them with little or no explicit training - FLA as an academic discipline focuses not on the development of specific languages, but the system of language itself. A linguist studying the progress of a child whose [[native speaker|native]] language is becoming [[Hindi language|Hindi]], for example, is probably seeking answers to similar questions as another tracking the development of a [[French language|French]]-speaking child.
Although all [[child]]ren raised in a normal environment ''acquire'' a particular language or languages - i.e. come to understand and produce them with little or no explicit training - FLA as an academic discipline focuses not on the development of specific languages, but the system of language itself. A linguist studying the progress of a child whose [[native speaker|native]] language is becoming [[Hindi language|Hindi]], for example, is probably seeking answers to similar questions as another tracking the development of a [[French language|French]]-speaking child.

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Language Acquisition
First language acquisition
Second language acquisition
Critical period hypothesis
Contrastive analysis
Fossilization
Applied linguistics
Monitor theory
Language teaching
Communicative approach
Comprehension approach
Multilingualism
Language attrition
Creolistics
Linguistics
Phonology
Syntax
Morphology
Semantics
Pragmatics
Theoretical linguistics
Generative linguistics
Cognitive linguistics
Language acquisition
First language acquisition
Second language acquisition
Applied linguistics
Psycholinguistics
Phonetics
Sociolinguistics
Creolistics
Evolutionary linguistics
Linguistic variation
Linguistic typology
Anthropological linguistics
Computational linguistics
Descriptive linguistics
Historical linguistics
Comparative linguistics
History of linguistics
Languagenaturalconstructed
Grammar

First language acquisition (FLA) refers to the emergence of language in infants, within the field of linguistics known as language acquisition. This covers the development of language in learners of all ages. FLA is an academic subject studied by theoretical linguists, but also involves others fields such as psychology. As linguists often argue that the process of FLA is similar to second language acquisition, these disciplines can overlap considerably.

Although all children raised in a normal environment acquire a particular language or languages - i.e. come to understand and produce them with little or no explicit training - FLA as an academic discipline focuses not on the development of specific languages, but the system of language itself. A linguist studying the progress of a child whose native language is becoming Hindi, for example, is probably seeking answers to similar questions as another tracking the development of a French-speaking child.

Footnotes